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Computer evidence

Computer evidence is a copy of a document stored in a computer file that is identical to the original. The legal “best evidence” rules change when it comes to the processing of computer evidence. Another unique aspect of computer evidence is the potential for unauthorized copies to be made of important computer files without leaving behind a trace that the copy was made. This situation creates problems concerning the investigation of the theft of trade secrets (e. g. , client lists, research materials, computeraided design files, formulas, and proprietary software).


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A temporary storage area, usually in RAM. The purpose of most buffers is to act as a holding area, enabling the CPU to manipulate data before transferring it to a device. Because the processes of reading and writing data to a disk are relatively slow, many programs keep track of data changes in a buffer and then copy the buffer to a disk. For example, word processors employ a buffer to keep track of changes to files. Then when you save the file, the word processor updates the disk file with the contents of the buffer. This is much more efficient than accessing the file on the disk each time you make a change to the file. Note that because your changes are initially stored in a buffer, not on the disk, all of them will be lost if the computer fails during an editing session. For this reason, it is a good idea to save your file periodically. Most word processors automatically save files at regular intervals. Another common use of buffers is for printing documents. When you enter a PRINT command, the operating system copies your document to a print buffer (a free area in memory or on a disk) from which the printer can draw characters at its own pace. This frees the computer to perform other tasks while the printer is running in the background. Print buffering is called spooling. Most keyboard drivers also contain a buffer so that you can edit typing mistakes before sending your command to a program. Many operating systems, including DOS, also use a disk buffer to temporarily hold data that they have read from a disk. The disk buffer is really a cache.
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A form of marking that embeds copyright information about the artist or owner. The process of digital watermarking hides information within a file that is known only to the file’s creator. If someone later creates an unauthorized copy of the content, the watermark can be used to detect the copy and (if uniquely watermarked files are provided to each original recipient) trace the offending copy back to the source.
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A rule that states that when a document is used as evidence in a court proceeding, the original document must be introduced. Copies will not be accepted as evidence unless certain exceptions to the rule apply.
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The term “computer forensics” was coined in 1991 in the first training session held by the International Association of Computer Specialists (IACIS) in Portland, Oregon. Since then, computer forensics has become a popular topic in computer security circles and in the legal community. Like any other forensic science, computer forensics deals with the application of law to a science. In this case, the science involved is computer science and some refer to it as Forensic Computer Science. Computer forensics has also been described as the autopsy of a computer hard disk drive because specialized software tools and techniques are required to analyze the various levels at which computer data is stored after the fact. Computer forensics deals with the preservation, identification, extraction, and documentation of computer evidence. The field is relatively new to the private sector, but it has been the mainstay of technologyrelated investigations and intelligence gathering in law enforcement and military agencies since the mid1980s. Like any other forensic science, computer forensics involves the use of sophisticated technology tools and procedures that must be followed to guarantee the accuracy of the preservation of evidence and the accuracy of results concerning computer evidence processing. Typically, computer forensic tools exist in the form of computer software.
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<p>Original Publication: <a target="_blank" href="https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/guidance">https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/guidance</a> <br>Original Document: <a target="_blank" href="https://downloads.cloudsecurityalliance.org/assets/research/security-guidance/security-guidance-v4-FINAL.pdf">https://downloads.cloudsecurityalliance.org/assets/research/security-guidance/security-guidance-v4-FINAL.pdf</a> <br></p><p>The issue with Original Document, is that it's not very Kindle compatible and is very hard on eyes. Document below has improved contrast and is easier to read.</p><p><strong>Kindle-Compatible PDF:<br></strong> <a target="_blank" href="https://www.sunflower-cissp.com/downloads/security-guidance-v4-FINAL/security-guidance-v4-FINAL_Sunflower.pdf">https://www.sunflower-cissp.com/downloads/security-guidance-v4-FINAL/security-guidance-v4-FINAL_Sunflower.pdf</a> <br><br></p><p><strong>File in DOCX format:<br></strong> <a target="_blank" href="https://www.sunflower-cissp.com/downloads/security-guidance-v4-FINAL/security-guidance-v4-FINAL_Sunflower.docx">https://www.sunflower-cissp.com/downloads/security-guidance-v4-FINAL/security-guidance-v4-FINAL_Sunflower.docx</a> </p>
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