MD4

An enhanced version of the MD2 algorithm, released in 1990. MD4 pads the message to ensure that the message length is 64 bits smaller than a multiple of 512 bits.


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The version of the MD algorithm released in 1991. MD5 processes 512-bit blocks of the message, using four distinct rounds of computation to produce a digest of the same length as the MD2 and MD4 algorithms (128 bits). Generally has been replaced by SHA-1 or other, more modern hashing algorithms.
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A new version of the SuperFrame that allows for more frames to be grouped together. In a T1 circuit, each of the 24 DS0 channels are sampled every 125 microseconds and 8 bits are taken from each. If you multiply the 8 bits by the 24 channels, you get 192 bits in a chain, and then add one bit for timing, you get 193 total bits in one frame. Twelve frames comprise the SuperFrame. For the Extended SuperFrame, we double the number of frames, making the total 24.
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A synchronizationframing format for a T1. In a T1 circuit, each of the 24 DS0 channels is sampled every 125 microseconds and 8 bits are taken from each. If you multiply the 8 bits by the 24 channels, you get 192 bits in a chain; and then add one bit for timing, and you get 193 total bits in one frame. Twelve frames comprise the SuperFrame. A newer version of this T1 formatting is called Extended SuperFrame (ESF).
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A private key cryptosystem published by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST). DES is a symmetric block cipher with a block length of 64 bits and an effective key length of 56 bits. DES has been used commonly for data encryption in the forms of software and hardware implementation. A standard cryptosystem proposed in 1977 for all government communications. DES and 3DES were superseded by Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) in December 2001. Cryptographic algorithm, designed for the protection of unclassified data and published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) Publication 46. (FIPS 463 withdrawn 19 May 2005) (. See Triple DES) and CNSS Advisory IA/0204 Revised March 2005)
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(1) A public key cryptosystem developed by Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman (RSA). The RSA has two different keys: the public encryption key and the secret decryption key. The strength of RSA depends on the difficulty of the prime number factorization. For applications with highlevel security, the number of the decryption key bits should be greater than 512 bits. RSA is used for both encryption and digital signatures. (2) Resource utilization, resource allocation. See Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman (RSA).
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